Tuesday, March 21, 2017

March 21, 2017: Wild Salmon Allies: Tribes and Others Resist FDA's Approval of GE Salmon

Wild salmon, an ecological keystone species in the Northwest, have played a central role in tribal life for generations. The quiet approval of genetically engineered salmon by the Food and Drug Administration doesn't sit well with tribes and fishing communities across the nation, who are rallying behind a lawsuit against the FDA which is making its way through the courts. In the Pacific Northwest, Coast Salish tribes and community allies held a wild-salmon cook out to bring attention to the issue, which they say is about food sovereignty and honoring of treaty rights. Martha Baskin has the story.

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Tuesday, March 7, 2017

March 7, 2017: Mooo! 284 Acres of Prime Organic Farmland Saved From Development

Organic farm and pasture land is as scarce as hens' teeth in some parts of the country. In Washington state it's no different, which is why a recent purchase of 284 acres of prime organic farmland was cause for celebration. Not just by the land trust that bought it and saved it from conversion into 59 estate homes, but by an organic dairy who's now on the high road to expansion. From the foothills of Mt. Rainier in Pierce County, Washington, Martha Baskin brings us the story.

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Wednesday, February 8, 2017

February 3, 2017: Climate Justice On Trial: WA State Jury Refuses to Convict First “Valve-Turner” in Four State Tar Sands Pipeline Action

In a surprise victory, a Washington state jury has refused to convict Ken Ward, the first of five "valve turners" who shut off tar sands pipelines from Canada to Washington in October of last year. Ken Ward, who turned off an emergency block valve on Kinder Morgans Trans-Mountain Pipeline, was charged with two felony counts. After more than five hours of deliberation, Ward's three day trial ended in a hung jury, with at least one juror refusing to convict. Martha Baskin has the story.

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Thursday, January 26, 2017

January 26, 2017: Owls: The Otherworldly Creatures Whose Habitat Relies on the Department of Interior

The 116th Congress has its hands full vetting cabinet nominations. Many are controversial, but one that's flying under the radar is the nominee for Interior Secretary who manages over 200 million acres of land – land that wildlife and ecosystems rely on. Trump's choice is Ryan Zinke, a freshman Republican Congressman from Montana. In this news feature Martha Baskin looks at the issue from the point of view of owls, including the great-horned owl and western screech owl.

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Friday, January 13, 2017

January 13, 2017: Tribal and Non-Native Water Protectors Challenge Wells Fargo to Divest from Dakota Access Pipeline

Since the fossil fuel divestment campaign began on university campuses in 2011 institutions worth $2.6 trillion have pulled their investments in coal, oil, and natural gas. The movement to demand financial institutions divest from the Dakota Access pipeline, which began late last year, is still in the early stages. 17 banks, including Wells Fargo, SunTrust and Citibank,are backing the pipeline. A recent protest in Seattle, lead by native leaders and water protector allies targeting Wells Fargo, shows the movement gaining momentum. Wells Fargo has close to $500 million invested in the pipeline.

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Wednesday, December 28, 2016

December 28, 2016: Owls: The Otherworldly Creatures Who Need Our Help

"You do not find owls – owls find you. Their camouflage conceals them until you catch a fleeting glimpse of broad, soft wings illuminated by the setting sun or, more likely, the moon." In this audio rich conversation with Paul Bannick, conservationist and photographer about his latest book, Owl: A Year in the Lives of North American Owls, we hear the owl's message and what North America's 19 distinct species need to survive.

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Tuesday, November 29, 2016

November 28, 2016: No Farms, No Food

Most of us are familiar with the bumper sticker, "no farms, no food," the rallying cry to protect farmland and nurture local, sustainably grown food. The cry has become increasingly relevant to farmers and farmland advocates on Seattle's urban fringe, 13 miles north of the Space Needle. They say current levels of development threaten their future. Martha Baskin takes us to the Sammamish Valley outside of Woodinville.

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